Polyurethane History, Polyurethane Coatings & Paints

Polyurethane History

Pioneering research on polyurethane polymers was conducted by Otto Bayer and his coworkers in 1937 at the laboratories of I.G. Farben in Leverkusen, Germany.[1] They recognized that using the polyaddition principle to produce polyurethanes from liquid diisocyanates and liquid polyether or polyester diols seemed to point to special opportunities, especially when compared to already existing plastics that were made by polymerizing olefins, or by polycondensation. The new monomer combination also circumvented existing patents obtained by Wallace Carothers on polyesters. Initially, work focused on the production of fibres and flexible foams. With development constrained by World War II (when PUs were applied on a limited scale as aircraft coating), it was not until 1952 that polyisocyanates became commercially available. Commercial production of flexible polyurethane foam began in 1954, based on toluene diisocyanate (TDI) and polyester polyols. These materials were also used to produce rigid foams, gum rubber, and elastomers. Linear fibers were produced from hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI) and 1,4-butanediol (BDO). Read More >>

Polyurethane Coatings

Polyurethane coatings are protecting many different structures today, such as storage tanks, oil and gas pipeline, water and wastewater, bridges, ships, and other facilities. The products have been effective because of their outstanding life expectancy and performance, resistance to aggressively corrosive environments, high abrasion resistance, fast application, low and cold temperature curing capability, strong adhesion, unlimited film build, and compliance with the most rigorous regulations on volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions. Read More >>

Polyurethane Protective Paints

Polyurethane paint provides a hard, durable gloss for crafts and model making and can be applied to almost any surface. There are several types of polyurethane paints, and several ways to apply them. The size of the project and the expected use will determine the best type of finish and method of application. You can choose from a simple spray can, to an extremely durable and high-gloss, two-part polyurethane paint. Read More >>